Welcome back to Get Rec’d! We’re quickly closing in on fifty of these things. I can hardly believe it!

There are a couple non-fiction titles below: one for foodies and one for history buffs. I’ve also included a picture book and a historical romance recommendation.

Have you received any recommendations lately? Any books you want to share with us? Sound out in the comments!

  • My Pet Feet

    My Pet Feet by Josh Funk

    I’ve recommended Josh Funk’s picture books before. They’re just so silly and fun. This one is written without the letter “r” and it results in some pretty funny text (i.e. ferret becomes “feet”).

    When the letter R suddenly vanishes, a whole town goes upside-down in this side-splitting picture book of alphabet chaos that’s Can I Be Your Dog? meets P Is for Pterodactyl .

    A little girl wakes up one day to find that R , a vital piece of the alphabet, has vanished! Suddenly, she has pet feet instead of a ferret . Flocks of cows replace crows flying in the sky. Giant shoes (not shores!) live on the sandy beaches of her town.

    What could have happened to the eighteenth letter of the alphabet? Did it get lost—or stolen? One way or another, the town needs to be saved!

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  • Raw Dog

    Raw Dog by Jamie Loftus

    This one is more a rec for me. If you’ve listened to any podcast with me on it, you’ve probably learned that I love hot dogs.

    A NEW YORK TIMES AND INDIE BESTSELLER!

    Part travelogue, part culinary history, all capitalist critique—comedian Jamie Loftus’s debut, Raw Dog , will take you on a cross-country road trip in the summer of 2021, and reveal what the creation, culture, and class influence of hot dogs says about America now.

    Featured NPR Weekend Edition • Bon Appétit • Oprah Daily • Glamour • NY Mag • Splendid Table • The Wall Street Journal • Eater • Betches • USA Today • Boston Globe • Eater • Slate • The Next Big Idea Club • Buzzfeed and more

    “Wise and funny” —ANDY RICHTER • “Revealing, funny, sad, horny, and insatiably curious” —SARAH MARSHALL • “A wild ride” —ROBERT EVANS • “Deeply incisive and hilariously honest” —JACK O’BRIEN • “Gonzo yet vulnerable” —GABE DUNN • “Hot dog Moby-Dick ” —BRANSON REESE • “One of the freshest and most insightful new comedic voices of this decade.” —LINDSAY ELLIS

    Hot dogs. Poor people created them. Rich people found a way to charge fifteen dollars for them. They’re high culture, they’re low culture, they’re sports food, they’re kids’ food, they’re hangover food, and they’re deeply American, despite having no basis whatsoever in America’s Indigenous traditions. You can love them, you can hate them, but you can’t avoid the great American hot dog.

    Raw The Naked Truth About Hot Dogs is part investigation into the cultural and culinary significance of hot dogs and part travelog documenting a cross-country road trip researching them as they’re served today. From avocado and spice in the West to ass-shattering chili in the East to an entire salad on a slice of meat in Chicago, Loftus, her pets, and her ex eat their way across the country during the strange summer of 2021. It’s a brief window into the year between waves of a plague that the American government has the resources to temper, but not the interest.

    So grab a dog, lay out your picnic blanket, and dig into the delicious and inevitable product of centuries of violence, poverty, and ambition, now rolling around at your local 7-Eleven.

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  • The Weaver Takes a Wife

    The Weaver Takes a Wife by Sheri Cobb South

    A historical romance for lovers of Mary Balogh and Mimi Matthews!

    Haughty Lady Helen Radney is one of London’s most beautiful women and the daughter of a duke, but her sharp tongue has frightened away most of her suitors. When her father gambles away his fortune, the duke’s only chance for recouping his losses lies in marrying off Lady Helen to any man wealthy enough to take a bride with nothing to recommend her but a lovely face and an eight-hundred-year-old pedigree. Enter Mr. Ethan Brundy, once an illegitimate workhouse orphan, now owner of a Lancashire textile mill and one of England’s richest men. When he glimpses Lady Helen at Covent Garden Theatre, he is instantly smitten and vows to marry her. But this commonest of commoners will have his work cut out for him if he hopes to win the heart of his aristocratic bride.

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  • Young Queens

    Young Queens by Leah Redmond Chang

    I know we have a ton of history nerds in the Bitchery and I’m happy to help add some new books to your TBR pile.

    The boldly original, dramatic intertwined story of Catherine de’ Medici, Elisabeth de Valois, and Mary, Queen of Scots—three queens exercising power in a world dominated by men.

    Orphaned from infancy, Catherine de’ Medici endured a tumultuous childhood. Married to the French king, she was widowed by forty, only to become the power behind the French throne during a period of intense civil strife. In 1546, Catherine gave birth to a daughter, Elisabeth de Valois, who would become Queen of Spain. Two years later, Catherine welcomed to her nursery the beguiling young Mary Queen of Scots, who would later become her daughter-in-law.

    Together, Catherine, Elisabeth, and Mary lived through the sea changes that transformed sixteenth-century Europe, a time of expanding empires, religious discord, and populist revolt, as concepts of nationhood began to emerge and ideas of sovereignty inched closer to absolutism. They would learn that to rule as a queen was to wage a constant war against the deeply entrenched misogyny of their time.

    Following the intertwined stories of the three women from girlhood through young adulthood, Leah Redmond Chang’s Young Queens paints a picture of a world in which a woman could wield power at the highest level yet remain at the mercy of the state, her body serving as the currency of empire and dynasty, sacrificed to the will of husband, family, kingdom.

    Add to Goodreads To-Read List →

    This book is available from:

    As an Amazon Associate we earn from qualifying purchases.

    We also may use affiliate links in
    our posts, as well. Thanks!

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